#25, 24.06.2018

Within Moscow’s hospitality industry, foreign restaurateurs tend to stand out with their vibrant and unusual projects. The fresh issue of the business magazine BIGMOSCOW (October — December 2018) analyzes the main trends in the development of the capital’s restaurant market, providing a compilation of expat entrepreneurs’ success stories. One of them is the Argentinian Adrian Quetglas, who has every reason to be proud of his career as a Moscow restaurateur and chef: one of his establishments got into the world’s Top 100, according to The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. Today, he co-owns two restaurants presenting his signature cuisine.

The Japanese confectioner Kobayashi Katsuhiko could not realize the dream of his own restaurant in France, where he had worked for a good ten years. In Moscow, he succeeded.

Six years ago, the Frenchman Johan Bott opened a tiny vegetarian café with an unusual concept in Moscow. Originally intended for friends and friends of friends, it has since become an iconic institution, and the number of guests increased dramatically.

The Italian Stefano Pizzuti has been doing business in Russia since the early 1990s, supplying restaurants with fresh Italian products. Four years ago, the food embargo forced him to diversify, and he began producing Italian cheeses in Russia.

As always, the new issue of BIGMOSCOW also contains many other stories about foreign entrepreneurs who succeeded in Moscow.

For the Englishman Anthony Kent, a half-year contract for teaching English has turned into twenty years of life in Moscow. Today, he runs his own school — the British Business Language Center.

The hero of another article is Teddyboy Greg — perhaps the most eccentric American businessman in Moscow. Last year, he opted for permanent residence in Russia “because of acute political differences with the US establishment” and opened a barbershop in Moscow. Tattooed from head to toe, he acts as a walking advertisement of his institution.

Under “modus operandi,” BIGMOSCOW explains, in detail, the procedure of registering a Russian company belonging to a foreigner entrepreneur. It differs little from the practice of most countries, but is much cheaper in terms of state duties and the minimum amount of share capital.

The BIGMOSCOW (Business Investment Guide to Moscow) magazine is published with the support of the Moscow Department of Foreign Economic and International Relations. It appears in Russian, English and German. All versions of the present issue (October — December 2018) are available via the AppStore and Google Play for free download to owners of smartphones and tablets worldwide.

Content

    • Place of action / Macroeconomics
      Growth trajectory
      • GDP dynamics, inflation and business lending rates, Moscow’s contribution to the national economy and other data needed to make a well-planned decision to invest in Russia
    • Persona / Private school owner
      Anthony Kent: “For a good business idea, any moment is opportune

      • “For the Englishman Anthony Kent, a half-year contract for teaching English has turned into twenty years of life in Moscow. Today, he runs his own school – the British Business Language Center.
  • Persona / Barber
    Teddyboy Greg: “Russia has lots of places where you can do good business”
    • Teddyboy Greg is perhaps the most eccentric American businessman in Moscow. Last year, he opted for permanent residence in Russia “because of acute political differences with the US establishment” and opened a barbershop in Moscow.
  • In focus / Moscow’s restaurant market
    Restaurateurs under the food embargo
    • Four years ago, Russia imposed an embargo on foods from countries supporting anti-Russian sanctions. Time to consider the results: the restaurant market has adapted, and expat entrepreneurs now produce their national gastronomic specialties in Russia.
  • In focus / The Moscow restaurant market 
    Smile and say “cheese”
    • The Italian Stefano Pizzuti has been supplying Russian restaurants with fresh Italian products since the early 1990s. Four years ago, the food embargo forced him to diversify, and he began producing Italian cheeses in Russia.
  • In focus / The Moscow restaurant market
    Adrian Quetglas and his personal touch
    • The Argentinian Adrian Quetglas has every reason to be proud of his career as a Moscow restaurateur and chef: one of his establishments got into the world’s Top 100 according to The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. Today, he co-owns two restaurants presenting his signature cuisine.
  • In focus / The Moscow restaurant market
    A Frenchman’s India in Moscow: Johan Bott’s café
    • Six years ago, the Frenchman Johan Bott and his Russian wife opened a tiny vegetarian café with an unusual concept in Moscow. Originally intended for friends and friends of friends, it has since become an iconic institution.
  • In focus / The Moscow restaurant market
    The sixth sense of Kobayashi Katsuhiko
    • The Japanese confectioner Kobayashi Katsuhiko could not realize the dream of his own restaurant in France, where he had worked for a good ten years. In Moscow, he succeeded – thanks not only to his working ethics and talent but also his intuition.
  • Modus operandi / Registering a company
    Business made in Russia
    • For a foreign entrepreneur, the procedure of registering a company in Russia is little different from the practice of most countries – but is much cheaper in terms of state duties and the minimum amount of share capital. We show exactly how it’s done, step by step.
  • Modus operandi / Participating in events
    Calendar of crucial business events in Moscow for October, November and December 2018
  • Modus vivendi / The price of Moscow
    Moscow in worldwide rankings of living expenses for expats
  • Modus vivendi / Personal experience
    Scenes of metropolitan life with Richard Peers
    • The Englishman Richard Peers began his acquaintance with Russia with a Trans-Siberian Railway trip. Then, he chose Moscow to realize his business idea: his British Football School combines sports with language learning. Peers shares his experience of life and entrepreneurship in Russia with the readers of BIGMOSCOW.
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